The origins of the National Certification Program (NCP) for home inspectors stretch back to 1997 when a report was issued by Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) that uncovered noteworthy inconsistencies in the skill and diligence of home inspectors across the country that still persist today. 

With the support of CMHC, Human Resources and Social Development Canada and the Construction Sector Council, a voluntary national accreditation and certification program was developed by the Canadian Association of Home and Property Inspectors (CAHPI) to help ensure the competency and professionalism of home inspectors. Home inspectors who have met the requirements of this national certification program are designated National Certificate Holders.

Unfortunately we continue to hear the widespread complaints of consumers and other stakeholders more than 10 years later regarding the services of home inspectors, some with designations.

Given growing consumer protests, especially regarding the poor quality of newly built homes, better consumer protection for home buyers is essential.  A Pre-Delivery Inspection Protocol needs to be a priority.

Following: http://www.canada.com/ottawacitizen/news/homes/story.html?id=a8949266-7947-44ce-b2d4-6a2228038978, you will find information regarding an interesting development in Ontario regarding private home inspection. 

Will the founding of PHPIO likely cause some confusion for Ontario consumers given that some of the key leaders with PHPIO were previously prominent leaders with CAHPI, such as Bill Mullen, a national Past-President of CAHPI?

I understand that BC (and Alberta) is also considering by-passing the NCP altogether (take that CMHC!), requiring private home inspectors to be provincially certified, licensed and regulated. 

Will this mean a reduced role, at least in these provinces, for home inspection associations such as CAHPI, NACHI, etc?

Until we hear back from the provincial government in BC, or other Canadian jurisdictions, I would appreciate hearing if you have any insights into what is happening to improve consumer protection in an unregulated private home inspection market. 

 

Home Inspector certification, licensing and regulation across Canada…
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3 thoughts on “Home Inspector certification, licensing and regulation across Canada…

  • November 27, 2008 at 4:12 pm
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    If you think the Ontario Securities Commission and other financial watchdogs are bad, regulation of home building and inspectors is worse.

    Example, Tarion inspectors in Ontario, and other warranty insurance provider inspectors in Canada, are not technically qualified to disallow consumer claims, and I know from personal experience.

    The housing industry needs to be nationally regulated and even more than the banks and stock exchanges are.

    Homes represent a large portion of the assets owned by Canadians. Homes are fundamental to our economy and families.

    When it comes to basic family shelter however, protection is limited.

    Reply
  • January 9, 2009 at 6:53 pm
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    Good points.

    It seems to me the problem stems from self regulation, legislation and good intent gone bad. What has resulted is more people turning to the courts to right the wrong and address the shortcomings.

    As a home inspector I am a proponent of licencing, the sooner the better. All home inspectors in Ontario need to be under one regulating body.

    Licencing would render associations useless, which have been less than satisfactory in fulfilling their mandates.

    Thank you for creating this blog.

    Raymond Wand
    Alton, ON

    Reply
  • September 10, 2009 at 2:51 pm
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    Sorry if this is a little off topic but this is for Ted at his request: Anyone entering the home inspection field should be trained in the unique discipline of home inspection. Assuming that the home inspector has been properly trained and has sufficient experience, they should be able to provide a satisfactory detailed inspection of a property within the scope of their education and any home inspector licensing requirements. Where licensing or certification is not a requirement, anyone can claim to be a home inspector, and there are no laws to prevent them from doing so. Basically watch your butt!—————————You’re welcome. William, -the Inspector Guy

    Reply

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